Construction

Regarding the building of hives and hive components.

Late last month, I was about to go on a week of vacation, so wanted to build the next box for the Langstroth hive. Now, bear in mind, that a hive box is just four sides, no top or bottom. This should be simple. And it seemed simple. But failure is just a measurement away.

Anyway, let's get on with this. I'm gonna build a simple box. Only takes three measurements: height, length and width. Again, pretty simple. Apparently, I'm not good at simple. Below is a photo of the finished box. Looks ok, right?

deep super hive box
A deceptively simple looking box.

Pretty simple construction, three screws per joint. All of the frames fit, sort of. The tightness of the frames in the box should have been my first clue something wasn't quite right. It wasn't until I put the frame on the hive that I realized things weren't measuring up.

New deep hive box doesn't fit
New deep hive box doesn't quite fit!

The box wound up being just around an inch too narrow. It had the right length, but somewhere I either screwed up a measurement, or my math skills betrayed me once again.

I left the box on the hive while I was on vacation. With a few shims, there were no gaps allowing things to get in the hive. But I resolved to come back and build a new box.

Of course, I forgot to take pictures of the building of the new box. But with Sarah's help, we got a new one made. And it fit!

For a bit of fun, we decided to let Sarah's kiddos paint it.

Painting the hive box.
Sarah and her kiddos painting the new hive box.

Not sure which wound up having more paint: the box or the kids. But we had a good time painting in the sun on my mother's lawn. When we finished we set the box aside to allow the paint to dry.

I came by the next day to put the box on the hive, transferring the frames from the too-small box. The new box fit nicely.

New box on hive
Two sides of the new, painted, bee box.
New box on hive.
The other two sides of the new bee box.

We've placed the queen excluder on, so the new box shouldn't be used for brood. Hopefully, we'll see the bees move into their new space, soon.

I promised a post about building a top bar hive, and here it is.

When Sarah and I started looking into keeping bees, the idea was to build the hives we needed. In this case, a Langstroth hive and what we knew as the "honey cow". A little digging suggested that the honey cow was just a different type of top bar hive.

Top bar hives proved interesting to me for several reasons. First, they are simple to construct. They don't require any fancy joinery, just straight cuts fastened together with nails or screws. Second, the rounded or angled shape both mimics the shape bees naturally make comb in, and it looks nice. Finally, the setup more closely replicates a natural hive location, such as a hollowed out tree or log.

There are disadvantages, of course. With no frames, the comb is very fragile and care must be taken not to break them when lifting the top bars. They cannot grow larger than you built the hive, unlike Langstroth hives to which you can add boxes.

I found a few plans online, but ultimately wound up buying the embarrassingly named Building Beehives For Dummies. I like this book because it contains plans for several different types of hives, including Langstroth and observation hives. The hive I built is from the chapter on building the Kenya Top Bar Hive.

So let's get on with it and post some construction pictures!

The wood used in the construction was all 1"x12" pine of varying lengths. It starts with the two end pieces that define the slope of the box. In this case the top is 18" and the bottom is 5".

top bar hive construction
Top bar hive construction. End pieces.

Per the instructions, I made the sides 34.5" long. This defines the living space the bees will have. I didn't quite follow the instructions for installing them, which suggested butting up against the inside of the end piece, instead opting to screw them into the sides. Just seemed stronger that way.

top bar hive construction
One side of the hive installed.
building a top bar hive
Both sides now attached. The basic shape is there.

With all the sides attached, the basic hive is there. This will be the living space for the bees. Not shown is a mesh that is placed on the bottom to allow debris and mites to fall out of the hive and to provide ventilation.

The next step is to make the top bars. These have to be a fairly specific size. A measurement known as "bee space" determines the bars width. Bees are picky about space. Too much space, and they will build comb where you don't want it. Too little space, and they won't build comb. Like Goldilocks, they want a space that is just right. This space depends on the type of bee, but for this hive, the books suggests a bar width of 1.3".

I took another departure from the book here. The book suggests cutting a kerf down the center of each bar and slotting a piece of balsa wood in it. I'd read about a simpler method online of pasting a string down the center with beeswax. I decided to give that a shot.

building a top bar hive
Setting up top bars by using beeswax to glue down a central string.

While I made a pretty big mess, this would prove to work. It also took less time (and money) than cutting and fitting balsa wood. There are 24 of these on the hive.

building a top bar hive
The hive with top bars in place.

The next step was to build a roof. Bees do not live in this section, it is meant to assist in ventilation and provide some protection from the elements. It is wider than the hive body to allow rain to flow off and away, but maintains the overall look.

building a top bar hive
The hive with the roof in place.

The only thing left at this point was to cut a hole for the bees to access the hive and put it in place. We chose a spot behind my mothers' firewood stack that would provide quick access to our garden.

After placing the bees they seemed to take to it quickly.

building a top bar hive
Bees accessing the top bar hive.

That access hole is a bit over an inch across. If, as I mentioned in a previous post, we are being robbed by other bees, I'll need to reduce the size.

I know I posted the below picture last time, but hey, proof that this hive works!

bee hive comb
Comb and bees! Lots of capped cells. These girls have been busy!

I definitely encourage anyone interested in beekeeping to try their hand at building a hive. If I can do it, anyone can.